World Book Day 2021

This year for World Book Day we asked our Trainers to send us their “good read” recommendations, whether this be business focused, wellbeing, coaching, sales or inspirational.

Louise:

Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes by William Bridges

“A thought provoking and helpful book when navigating any change in life that helps guide the reader through coping with the inevitable changes in life – whether welcomed or not.”

Jacqui:

Why Men Don’t Listen and Women Can’t Read Map by Alan and Barbara Pease

“My reasons are that they used brain scans to show how men and women’s brains are wired differently and how they react to the same situation. Explains a lot and is fascinating, and I use this in training that it’s good to have differences. And it’s very funny when read with your partner…”

Jean:

The GO- GIVER by Bob Burg and John David Mann

“Not a fan of massive books with small type so this is a quick and easy read, told in the style of a story about a guy called Joe chasing business success. In many ways, it’s like a parable about what true success really is and how to achieve it. I read this in one day on holiday and loved it!”

BLINK by Malcom Gladwell

“From the very first story about ‘the statue that didn’t look right’, this book ‘had’ me. I literally couldn’t put it down! For someone who is a self-confessed perfectionist and hideously risk-averse, this was a really inspiring and challenging read about what would happen if we started to truly trust our gut instincts. Awesome … and I’m still working on it!”

Kate:

Emma and I by Sheila Hocken 

“An autobiography that details her growing up as a blind child, her relationship with her chocolate Labrador guide dog, Emma, and then regaining her sight as a young woman through surgery. Hocken and Emma go through many different obstacles together, both sad and happy.  An inspirational read about resilience, acceptance, loyalty and overcoming adversity.” 

Zahoor:

Power of Your Subconscious Mind by Joseph Murphy

“I found this book inspiring on so many levels. One thing we often see/hear is how people end up where they are. We often don’t know that we make things happen, even if we think we don’t. Our subconscious is extremely powerful because it is the driver of our behaviour (our habits) which mean we get certain results. Unfortunately, many of our habits have been formed (through certain experiences) when we were young, like during our teenage years. And too many adults keep those habits even when they aren’t serving us. However, we do have the power of choice and can change those habits in adult life if we choose to. This book highlights, in a nice way, how we can take control of that process.  I believe this is one of those books that will stand the test of time and will be talked about as a classic, if it already isn’t.”

Ellie:

The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor

“Really good for understanding how much happiness benefits especially in the work place.”

Character Strengths Matter: How to live a full life by Polly and Britton

“Brilliant for a positive approach to developing employees rather than looking for weaknesses which is demoralising.”

Permission to Feel by Marc Brackett

“Normalising emotions, especially childhood development.”

Anything written by Brene Brown

Letting Go by David Hawkins

“wow. Just wow!”

Steve:

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! by Dr Seuss.

“Read the first 6 or so pages at the beginning of a leadership workshop and it captures people’s imagination, creates a ‘fun’ culture for the workshop and a good foundation to refer to regularly.”

7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey

“Should be on everybody’s list”

101 Hints and Tips for Amazing Presentations by Steve Torjussen

“a best seller on Amazon by yours truly!”

Helen

The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse by Charlie Mackesy

“Not sure what you’d classify it as other than lovely!”

Close to the Wind by Pete Goss

“Relates to resilience”

Elaine

7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey

“Good to dip into and useful strategies such as 5 levels of listening, circle of influence and concern and think win win.  Always make great discussion starters and useful for action planning.”

Mandy

Youtube – Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are by Amy Cuddy

Sarah A

Sapiens: History of Mankind by Yuval Noah Harari

“Deep”

Revolting Rhymes by Roald Dahl

“Maybe one for kids but great stuff”

Fran

The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson

That’s Not My Duck by Fiona Watt & Rachel Wells

Sign & Singalong – Incey Wincey Spider (BSL) by Annie Kubler

Sing & Singalong – Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star (BSL) by Annie Kubler

“While the majority of my reading is currently with my 2 year old, these books represent wellbeing ensuring we have daily one on one time together before he goes to bed”

Keith

In the Morning I’ll Be Gone – (plus others in the Detective Duffy series) by Adrian McKinty

“Crime novels set in Northern Ireland during “the troubles”.  All are a good read and give an insightful look into the conflict from an author who has experienced challenges and disappointment at one time causing him to quit writing.”

Leanne

Time to Think by Nancy Kline

“Her encouragement and guidance of how important it is to listen is key, especially now: ‘the quality of your attention determines the quality of the other people’s thinking.’  It’s powerful stuff”

Stuart

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

“A very provoking modern look at a counterintuitive approach to living a good life”

Sun Tza The Art of War for Executives by Donald G Krause

“Takes Sun Tzu’s thinking, planning and strategy’s and reframes them into modern business and life”

Hilary

The Book of Joy by the Dalai Llama and Desmond Tutu

The Happiness Track by Emma Seppala

Simon

How To Be F*cking Awesome by Dan Meredith

“Gives you a right kick up the backside”

Denise

Who Moved My Cheese by Dr Spencer Johnson

“Short and thought provoking”

Jemma

Our Iceberg is Melting by John Kotter

“This is great at dealing with change”

Relentless by Eddie Hearn

“Colourful language but is all about being resilient”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s